Task #1 ‘Big Brother Australia’

Students:

Zoe Koulouris s3378022

Cassandra Wibawa s3393738

Sarah Abiharb s3379113

Tute: Wendesday, 11:30am

LINK TO PRESENTATION (google drive):

https://docs.google.com/a/rmit.edu.au/presentation/d/1ewzOcmRw9iOHJKvbi-GT8soJTAkJKA55HDqCTmyTang/edit?usp=sharing

READING SUMMARIES

Scolari, C. (2009) Transmedia Storytelling: Implicit consumers, Narrative Worlds, and Branding in Contemporary Media Production. International Journal of Communications 3. (p.586-601)

This reading surrounds the concept of transmedia storytelling, “from the perspective of a semiotics of branding”(Scolari, 2009, p. 586), drawing from the television series 24 in order to contextualize this new and ever-adaptable media collaboration.

With the help of transmedia storytelling (TS), storytellers have gone beyond a simple marketing strategy “to develop the same story in different media”(Scolari, 2009, p. 589), and now have the ability to create “heavyweight narrative brands” that express themselves in various ways across various platforms (Scolari, 2009, p. 590). TS can be seen as a new “dimension of the multimodal discourse” which creates a new world expressed on multiple levels (2009, p. 589).

Through his analysis of 24 he proposes a complex “semiotic device for generating multiple implicit (trans) media consumers” classified in 3 levels; single text consumers, single media consumers, and the transmedia consumer (Scolari, 2009, p. 597). This is fundamental for storytellers in creating various entry points into their fictional world (in this case 24) based on the competence of their specific consumers. Transmedia stories are therefore characterized by “a radical structure” that facilitates its expansion (Scolari, 2009, p. 598).

Further, from a semiotic perspective, branding is very important in producing discourse and giving a narrative meaning for its audiences (Scolari, 2009, p.599). product placement is no new thing across various broadcast narratives, but TS goes even further, “fiction is the brand” (Scolari, 2009, p. 599).

His approach offers a new insight into TS; branding expressed in characters, topics, and style of the fictional world, all of which can be translated into different languages and media (Scolari, 2009, p.600).

Zoe Koulouris

s3378022

Edwards, L, H. (2013) The Triumph of Reality TV: The Revolution in American Television. 1st ed. California, USA: ABC-CLIO, LLC. (p. 1-4)

Reality shows are now at the forefront of new and innovative media developments. It gained popularity by capitalizing on recent media trends, including new directions in story telling, emotional appeals to audiences, and taking content from TV to other media platforms. Reality programs capture touchstone issues and emphasize their conflict and drama, grabbing viewer attention and fanning anxieties. Many of the media trends reality TV exploits involve incorporating developments in new media, more simply following the popularity of multi-platform storytelling. The goal of this multiplatform storytelling is to create an entire narrative universe that active fans are drawn to, with each additional element of the transmedia franchise able to exist on its own, but also contribute to the larger whole.

The major development of transmedia in TV is for programs to generated a range of related media items such as DVDs with added features, video games, interactive websites, content and games for mobile phones, novels, tie-in books, etc. It is significant that reality TV can create strong enough characters and storylines to generate this kind of transmedia storytelling. Exploitations in reality TV have also been identified.

Reality TV shows are now mixing genres, for example documentary is now combined with fictional TV genres such as sitcom and game show. It is also turning cast members into characters (using familiar narrative codes to turn real people’s lives into stories). Besides that, it sparks greater audience interaction and fan participation, having audiences to vote for their favourite cast of the show. Further it encourages the viewer’s to create emotional connections to cast members with techniques like confessionals, dairy cameras, and access to the cast on social networking websites.

Cassandra Wibawa

s3383738

Evans, E (2011), Transmedia Television: Audiences, New Media, and Daily Life. Routledge, New York. (p.1-40)

In her book, “Transmedia Television: Audiences, New Media, and Daily Life”, Elizabeth Evans explores the way that viewers have found new way to share access, and engage with television episodes. Evans’ core focus on audience response to their ability to willingly integrate Transmedia gaming, mobile television, and downloaded episodes into their everyday engagement with television content.

One of her main points is about understanding television as a medium. Marketing material, sequels, merchandising and branding can all help shape the viewer’s experience of a single ‘text’ and how they work across multiple media platforms. The second one considers how audiences react to content available on various platforms in their daily lives.

Evans suggests that “web content can be used to provide additional engagement in relation to texts originally found on television” (Evans 2011, p.34), which is a concept that has become central to the understanding of how emerging new media technologies are leading to the creation of new forms of narrative content and audience engagement, which is an important aspect of Transmedia.

To conclude, Evans argues that emerging video platforms are transforming the traditional definition of television and its specific characteristics. Evans’s approach reminds us of the value of contrasting the opinions and behavior of actual audience members with industry expectations of what viewers want or how they will engage with a multiplatform text.

Sarah Abiharb

s3379113

KEY INSIGHTS:

– Transmedia elements are not “add-ons” but well thought out pieces to the narrative

– Different artifacts should be able to work as single artifacts

– When you think about your project have an in depth understanding of audience and what their involvement will be within the narrative

– Understand the audience’s ability to actually use the technologies you present them with

– Audience interaction and fan participation is made easier with transmedia elements for television shows.

– Good media franchise attracts a wider audience

– Transmedia elements when working together can make a whole new world of its own

– the brand is the narrative. All the different pieces of the puzzle need to be able to be seen as part of the ONE narrative world. They need to be consistent in every way, while at the same time being able to fit their specific media form perfectly.

– Big brother has shown that reality television can also make use of the ever-expanding multimodal platforms

BIBLIOGRAPHY

• Edwards, L. H., (2012). Transmedia Storytelling, Corporate Synergy, and Audience Expression. Global Media Journal, [Online]. 12/20, 1-3.
• Edwards, L, H. (2013) The Triumph of Reality TV: The Revolution in American Television. 1st ed. California, USA: ABC-CLIO, LLC. (p. 1-4)
• Evans, E (2011), Transmedia Television: Audiences, New Media, and Daily Life. Routledge, New York. (p.1-40)
• Jenkins, H. (2003). Transmedia storytelling. Moving characters from books to films to video games can make them stronger and more compelling. Technology Review. Online. http://www.digitallearning.macfound.org/

• Jenkins, H. (2006). Convergence culture: Where old and new media collide. New York: New York University Press.

• Jenkins, H. (2006). Convergence culture: Where old and new media collide. New York: New York University Press.

• Scolari, C. (2009) Transmedia Storytelling: Implicit consumers, Narrative Worlds, and Branding in Contemporary Media Production. International Journal of Communications 3. (p.586-601)

• Scolari, C. (2009) Transmedia Storytelling: Implicit consumers, Narrative Worlds, and Branding in Contemporary Media Production. International Journal of Communications 3. (p.586-601)

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